Construction

  • May 21, 2024

    9th Circ. Axes Forest Service's Calif. Mining Exemption

    A split Ninth Circuit panel on Tuesday cut down the U.S. Forest Service's approval of gold exploration mining in California's Inyo National Forest, handing a win to environmentalists who had opposed the project for its potential impacts to threatened sage grouse and endangered fish.

  • May 21, 2024

    Toll Bros. Lobs Legal Malpractice Claims At Gordon Rees

    Luxury home builder Toll Bros. Inc. has filed legal malpractice and breach of contract claims against Gordon Rees Scully Mansukhani LLP, claiming that the California-based firm didn't comply with discovery obligations, among other failures while representing Toll Bros. in a dispute over a project in Washington state.

  • May 21, 2024

    OSHA Hit With Constitutional Challenge To Walkaround Rule

    A dozen business groups led by the U.S. Chamber of Commerce sued the Occupational Safety and Health Administration over the so-called walkaround rule in Texas federal court Tuesday, challenging the constitutionality of a two-month-old regulation that expanded workers' right to bring in outside representatives during job safety inspections.

  • May 21, 2024

    Feds Say Importer Can Get US Steel, Instead Of Duty Relief

    The U.S. Department of Commerce defended its refusal to exempt a steel company from potentially millions of dollars worth of national security tariffs, saying it was swayed by evidence that the company could source materials domestically.

  • May 21, 2024

    Caterpillar To Pay $800K To End DOL Race Bias Probe

    Heavy equipment manufacturer Caterpillar Inc. has agreed to pay $800,000 to resolve U.S. Department of Labor allegations that it refused to hire qualified Black applicants for welding positions at an Illinois facility, the agency said Tuesday.

  • May 21, 2024

    NC Panel Cans Atty's 'Grossly Excessive' Fees In Wage Suit

    A North Carolina appeals court rejected a real estate agent's bid to be awarded nearly $500,000 in attorney fees after winning an unpaid wages lawsuit, reasoning Tuesday that state wage law doesn't require that fees be granted to a prevailing party.

  • May 21, 2024

    Strategic Hiring Was The New Normal For BigLaw In 2023

    The 400 largest law firms by headcount in the U.S. grew more slowly in 2023 than in the previous two years, while Kirkland & Ellis LLP surpassed the 3,000-attorney threshold, according to the latest Law360 ranking.

  • May 21, 2024

    The Law360 400: Tracking The Largest US Law Firms

    The legal market expanded more tentatively in 2023 than in previous years amid a slowdown in demand for legal services, especially in transactions, an area that has been sluggish but is expected to quicken in the latter half of the coming year.

  • May 21, 2024

    Contractor For Exxon, QatarEnergy LNG Venture Hits Ch. 11

    The general contractor for a liquefied natural gas project co-owned by Exxon Mobil Corp. and QatarEnergy filed for Chapter 11 protection in Texas bankruptcy court Tuesday with more than $1 billion of debt, saying it intends to use the court process to back out of the Texas venture.

  • May 20, 2024

    Justices Turn Away Hospital Construction Feud

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday rejected a case that centers on a $180 million project to expand a Mississippi children's hospital, once again declining to resolve whether parties that agree to certain arbitral rules have also agreed to delegate jurisdictional questions to the arbitrator.

  • May 20, 2024

    NC License Law Didn't Violate 1st Amendment, 4th Circ. Finds

    The Fourth Circuit held on Monday that North Carolina's licensing requirements for surveyors don't violate the free speech rights of a drone pilot who sought to create maps for customers, with the court finding the state regulation is backed by sound public interests.

  • May 20, 2024

    Mich. Town Can't Block $2B Battery Plant, Judge Rules

    A Michigan federal judge has ordered that Green Charter Township can't prevent Gotion Inc.'s upcoming battery components plant, in which the company plans on investing more than $2 billion, from moving forward.

  • May 20, 2024

    Nonprofits Renew Bid To Enter Red States' Border Wall Suit

    Two nonprofits urged a Texas federal court to add them to a challenge to the Biden administration's plans to use border wall appropriations for remediation projects, saying they were shocked by the administration's acceptance of an order suspending the plan.

  • May 20, 2024

    Caterpillar, Equipment Co. Seek New Trial After $100M Verdict

    Caterpillar and a defunct equipment importer have asked a Delaware federal court for a new trial after a jury cleared Caterpillar of antitrust violations but found it caused the importer $100 million in damages by interfering with its contract.

  • May 20, 2024

    Colo. Justices Toss Decision That Restricted Appeals

    The Colorado Supreme Court on Monday said a lower court had made it too hard for parties to get immediate interlocutory appeals, with justices finding appellants should not have to show a hardship or injustice in order to do so.

  • May 20, 2024

    Stanley Black & Decker Nixes $3.8M Factory Equipment Suit

    Stanley Black & Decker Inc. has dropped a $3.8 million lawsuit against a supplier that it accused of providing faulty equipment for a factory in Texas that ultimately shut down, according to a filing in Connecticut federal court.

  • May 20, 2024

    Settlement Ends Insurer's Stormwater Coverage Suit

    An H.W. Kaufman Group insurer settled a lawsuit seeking a declaration that it owed no coverage to a home construction company or its owner in an underlying suit accusing the company of performing defective work that led to pooling stormwater, according to a notice filed in Georgia federal court.

  • May 20, 2024

    Justices Stay Out Of Pipeline Land Fight With FERC

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday refused to review the D.C. Circuit decision dismissing a suit challenging the constitutionality of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's eminent domain authority brought by Virginia landowners along the route of the Mountain Valley pipeline.

  • May 17, 2024

    Real Estate Authority: Loan Doctors, CFIUS, Mixed-Use Boom

    Catch up on the week's key developments by state from Law360 Real Estate Authority — including potential conflicts of interest in special servicing, a data center buy stymied by the Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States, and one hospitality pro's prediction for more mixed-use residential and hotel demand.

  • May 17, 2024

    Insurer Escapes Claim In SimulTV's Tower Work Deal Suit

    Development & Managers Group can't go after the insurer of a company that accused it of taking a down payment on the purchase of three DMG-owned television stations and then looking for other potential buyers, a Louisiana federal court has ruled.

  • May 17, 2024

    Judge Rails At Attys' Failure To Prep For Evasion Case Queries

    A U.S. Court of International Trade judge lambasted the government's counsel during oral arguments Friday in a Cambodian pipe company's suit over a tariff evasion probe for failing to answer her questions, even with time to prepare.

  • May 17, 2024

    DC Circ. Probes Carbon Capture In LNG Approval Challenge

    The D.C. Circuit on Friday questioned the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's decision to reapprove a Texas liquefied natural gas terminal without considering the terminal developer's proposal to add environmentally friendly modifications, amid renewed challenges to the agency's authorization of LNG facilities in the Lone Star State.

  • May 17, 2024

    New Domestic Content Guidance May Boost Energy Credits

    The U.S. Treasury Department's new guidance on bonus tax credits for clean energy projects that source domestic-made materials and components aims to simplify the process for determining eligibility and spur more development to get those extra incentives.

  • May 17, 2024

    Pot Co. Can Amend Complaint Or Reply To Dismissal Motion

    A Michigan federal judge has given a cannabis company three weeks to either amend its complaint against a former business partner or respond to a motion to dismiss its claims that the former business partner sabotaged a project by convincing investors to put their money elsewhere.

  • May 17, 2024

    Wash. Energy Codes Challenged Again After 9th Circ. Decision

    In the wake of a Ninth Circuit ruling that forced Washington officials to revisit regulations on natural gas appliances used in new construction, a group of natural gas companies, homeowners and construction interests are claiming the state's apparent fix is again out of step with federal law.

Expert Analysis

  • In Debate Over High Court Wording, 'Wetland' Remains Murky

    Author Photo

    Though the U.S. Supreme Court's decision limiting the Clean Water Act’s wetlands jurisdiction is now a year old, Sackett v. EPA's practical consequences for property owners are still evolving as federal agencies and private parties advance competing interpretations of the court's language and methods for distinguishing wetlands in lower courts, says Neal McAliley at Carlton Fields.

  • Geothermal Energy Has Growing Potential In The US

    Author Photo

    Bipartisan support for the geothermal industry shows that geothermal energy can be an elegant solution toward global decarbonization efforts because of its small footprint, low supply chain risk, and potential to draw on the skills of existing highly specialized oil and gas workers and renewable specialists, say attorneys at Weil.

  • Insurance Types That May Help Cos. After Key Bridge Collapse

    Author Photo

    Following the collapse of the Francis Scott Key Bridge, businesses that depend on the bridge, the Port of Baltimore and related infrastructure for shipment and distribution of cargo should understand which common types of first-party insurance coverage may provide recoveries for financial losses, say Bert Wells and Richard Lewis at Reed Smith.

  • Exploring An Alternative Model Of Litigation Finance

    Author Photo

    A new model of litigation finance, most aptly described as insurance-backed litigation funding, differs from traditional funding in two key ways, and the process of securing it involves three primary steps, say Bob Koneck, Christopher Le Neve Foster and Richard Butters at Atlantic Global Risk LLC.

  • NY's Vision For Grid Of The Future: Flexible, Open, Affordable

    Author Photo

    Acknowledging that New York state's progress toward its climate goals is stalling, the New York Public Service Commission's recent "Grid of the Future" order signals a move toward more flexible, cost-effective solutions — and suggests potential opportunities for nonutility participation, say Daniel Spitzer and William McLaughlin at Hodgson Russ.

  • Series

    Teaching Yoga Makes Me A Better Lawyer

    Author Photo

    Being a yoga instructor has helped me develop my confidence and authenticity, as well as stress management and people skills — all of which have crossed over into my career as an attorney, says Laura Gongaware at Clyde & Co.

  • A Vision For Economic Clerkships In The Legal System

    Author Photo

    As courts handle increasingly complex damages analyses involving vast amounts of data, an economic clerkship program — integrating early-career economists into the judicial system — could improve legal outcomes and provide essential training to clerks, say Mona Birjandi at Data for Decisions and Matt Farber at Secretariat.

  • What A Louisiana Ruling Means For Pipeline Crossings

    Author Photo

    After a Louisiana appeals court's recent ruling on a conflict between two pipeline projects, operators and developers should review pipeline crossings to ensure that they occur at safe distances — and keep in mind the value of crossing agreements for protecting both sides in case of a dispute, say attorneys at McGuireWoods.

  • E-Discovery Quarterly: Recent Rulings On Text Message Data

    Author Photo

    Electronically stored information on cellphones, and in particular text messages, can present unique litigation challenges, and recent court decisions demonstrate that counsel must carefully balance what data should be preserved, collected, reviewed and produced, say attorneys at Sidley.

  • Series

    Swimming Makes Me A Better Lawyer

    Author Photo

    Years of participation in swimming events, especially in the open water, have proven to be ideal preparation for appellate arguments in court — just as you must put your trust in the ocean when competing in a swim event, you must do the same with the judicial process, says John Kulewicz at Vorys.

  • How EB-5 Regional Centers Can Prepare For USCIS Audits

    Author Photo

    In response to the recently announced U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services guidelines that require EB-5 regional center audits every five years to verify their compliance with immigration and securities laws, regional centers should take steps to facilitate a seamless audit process, say Jennifer Hermansky and Miriam Thompson at Greenberg Traurig.

  • As Arbitrator Bias Claims Rise, Disclosure Standards Evolve

    Author Photo

    The growth in post-award challenges based on arbitrators' alleged conflicts of interest has led to the release of new guidance and new case law on the topic — both supporting the view that professional familiarity alone does not translate to a lack of impartiality, say attorneys at Skadden.

  • Don't Use The Same Template For Every Client Alert

    Author Photo

    As the old marketing adage goes, consistency is key, but law firm style guides need consistency that contemplates variety when it comes to client alert formats, allowing attorneys to tailor alerts to best fit the audience and subject matter, says Jessica Kaplan at Legally Penned.

  • Data Shows H-2B Wages May Be Skewed High By Sample Size

    Author Photo

    Occupational Wage and Employment Statistics wage data from April illustrates that smaller sample sizes from less populated areas may be skewing prevailing wages for H-2B visas artificially high, potentially harming businesses that rely on the visa program, says Stephen Bronars at Edgeworth Economics.

  • Series

    Walking With My Dog Makes Me A Better Lawyer

    Author Photo

    Thanks to my dog Birdie, I've learned that carving out an activity different from the practice of law — like daily outdoor walks that allow you to interact with new people — can contribute to professional success by boosting creativity and mental acuity, as well as expanding your social network, says Sarah Petrie at the Massachusetts Attorney General’s Office.

Want to publish in Law360?


Submit an idea

Have a news tip?


Contact us here
Hello! I'm Law360's automated support bot.

How can I help you today?

For example, you can type:
  • I forgot my password
  • I took a free trial but didn't get a verification email
  • How do I sign up for a newsletter?
Ask a question!